San Diego, California (NAPSI) - The flu is nothing to sneeze at: Between the extreme body aches, chills and high temperatures, the flu threatens your well-being.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 5 to 20 percent of Americans come down with it each year, hospitalizing more than 200,000—but there are ways to keep yourself and your family out of such statistics this season.

How the Cold and Flu Are Spread

The cold and flu are spread mainly by the germs released when someone already infected coughs, sneezes or speaks. A single sneeze can send 100,000 germs into the air, allowing virus droplets to land in the mouths or noses of people up to six feet away. The cold or flu might also be contracted by touching something that has the virus on it and then touching the mouth or nose. A person may be able to pass the cold or flu to someone else before he or she begins to notice symptoms, which typically appear one to four days after the virus enters the body. That means people can spread the virus a day before they know they have it and up to seven days after symptoms start.

Flu symptoms often include fever, chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, fatigue, vomiting and diarrhea.

The Pharmacist’s Prevention Advice

To avoid falling victim to the cold and flu, follow these tips from author and syndicated columnist Suzy Cohen, RPh, known as America’s Pharmacist:

• Prepare your body in advance. Get your annual flu vaccination. Supplements such as vitamins C and D and probiotics may help boost your immune system before an infection sets in.

• Keep clean. Viruses can also live on surfaces for two to eight hours or longer outside the body, so frequent hand washing is one of the best ways to avoid getting sick and spreading illness.

• Control stress. Stress weakens the immune system. To prevent additional immune suppression, an ample amount of rest is also needed.

What To Do if the Cold or Flu Still Gets You

“Arming people with a new approach to cold and flu relief specifically designed to target points of virus entry—the throat and nose—can provide protection when those around them are not feeling well. In addition, it can help anyone who’s already feeling the onset of symptoms,” says Cohen.

Many individuals get relief from a nonprescription, homeopathic spray such as FluNada, designed to inhibit replication of cold and flu viruses by coating the nasal and throat pathways. It was developed by a physician and a pharmacist looking to close the gap between vaccines for influenza prevention and anti-viral medication for treatment.

The zinc-free formula contains a blend of safe and natural homeopathic ingredients—including elderberry, mint, eucalyptus and gaultheria—which are endorsed by the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia and recognized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

How To Use It

FluNada may be used by adults and children over the age of 4 at the first sign of symptoms. Simply spray it three times to the throat and once in each nostril, four times daily for up to five days.

Learn More

Visit www.FluNada.com for further information, including a list of nearby retailers who offer the product.